Natural remedies for asthma

by | Oct 14, 2021 | Asthma

Asthma is an inflammatory lung disease. When the muscles around the lungs contract, it can trigger asthma. Globally, 300 million people suffer from asthma, and nearly 250,000 people die from asthma each year. Asthma causes symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Certain triggers can cause a sudden onset of asthma, and it can also be caused by respiratory infections or allergies. Obese people with a body mass index above 30 have a doubled risk of asthma, as are the other risk factors listed below. There is also exercise-induced asthma, which occurs after strenuous exercise. Interestingly, people with this type of asthma usually do not feel the symptoms. According to the frequency of respiratory symptoms,

Asthma is divided into four levels:

Mild asthma

Intermittent asthma

Mild persistent

Severe persistence

Risk factors for asthma include:

pollen allergy

Family history of asthma

Food allergies, including dairy products, wheat and sulfites

Allergies to chemical substances, including food coloring and preservatives

Smoking or secondhand smoke

African ancestry

Latin American

Overweight or obese

Air pollution

Acid reflux

How to prevent asthma?

It has been proven that early contact with cats and dogs and other animals can reduce the risk of asthma in children or adults. On the contrary, not contacting these animals in childhood may increase the risk of disease, causing them to avoid contact later. A study published in 2018 showed that children who had taken antibiotics before one year of age had a higher risk of developing asthma. This may be due to the destruction of healthy gut bacteria. If you have asthma, try to avoid triggers that make your symptoms worse. Keeping an asthma diary may help to find out the causes and patterns.

Traditional treatment: In addition to avoiding triggers, prescription medication is the main method of traditional asthma treatment. In many cases, these drugs can save lives and it is important to have them ready. Commonly used drugs include: beta agonists-these drugs include salbutamol (Proair, Ventolin) or levalbuterol (Xopenex), which are often used as inhalants or with nebulizers during acute attacks. Such drugs are considered “rescue drugs”. If used more than twice a week, steroid inhalers are recommended. Steroid inhalers-these drugs are used to control and prevent asthma attacks. Such as fluticasone and beclomethasone inhalants. After inhaling this drug, you must rinse your mouth to prevent oral yeast infections, commonly known as thrush. Leukotriene inhibitors-This class of drugs includes montelukast (shunerning). These drugs inhibit what doctors call leukotrienes. This chemical can cause inflammation, restriction and obstruction of the airways. Oral steroids-can help during acute attacks. Although it is sometimes necessary, the use of oral steroids should be reduced as much as possible, because frequent use can increase the risk of osteoporosis and gastric ulcers.

Probiotics

A healthy gut microbiome is essential for a strong immune system. A study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2015 proved that the diversity of gut bacteria is an important part of preventing allergies and asthma symptoms. Lactic acid bacteria play an important role. Children born by caesarean section have a higher risk of asthma than those born through the birth canal (which is rich in lactic acid bacteria). Asthma studies in animals have proven the benefits of probiotics in preventing asthma.

Magnesium

Magnesium is a natural muscle relaxant and an important mineral and enzyme “cofactor”, which participates in more than 350 chemical reactions in the human body. Adequate intake of magnesium-rich foods (including green leafy vegetables) is essential. Normally, the diet is not enough and needs to be supplemented.

Fish oil

Omega-3 essential fatty acids mainly include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which are very important for maintaining optimal body function. A study published in the Nutrition Journal in 2014 showed that most Americans do not consume enough omega-3 oil, and its food sources include fish (mackerel, cod, and salmon are the most abundant), walnuts, and chia seeds , Flax seeds, hemp seeds and natto.

Vitamin D

In the past ten years, thousands of studies have shown the health benefits of a reasonable intake of vitamin D. These studies tell us that people with higher levels of vitamin D in the blood have a lower risk of chronic diseases such as asthma.

Folic acid

Folic acid comes from the term “leaf” (used to describe green vegetables). Regular consumption of vegetables helps to ensure adequate folate content in the body. A 2016 study among 582 children in Puerto Rico showed that children with lower blood folic acid levels are at higher risk of asthma attacks.

L-carnitine

L-carnitine is an important compound essential to promote metabolism in the human body. About one in 350 people cannot synthesize L-carnitine. However, among the people who can synthesize L-carnitine, some people may have more needs than their bodies can produce. A 2009 study showed that compared with patients with stable asthma, children with disease have lower levels of L-carnitine in the blood. The study did not test healthy children.

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